Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2005): Care of the Elderly - UK

CARE SERVICES: A CAUSE FOR CONCERN

J. Robinson

Working with Older People, vol.9, Mar. 2005, p.31-33

Reports on the preliminary findings of a King's Fund inquiry into provision of care services for older people in London. Researchers have found a care system that:

  • offers little choice to older people;
  • features serious service shortages and quality deficits;
  • is beset with staffing difficulties and challenging funding pressures;
  • where there is minimal collaboration between local authorities in commissioning and providing care services across boundaries.

CURTAINS FOR CARE HOMES?

K. Leason

Community Care, Apr.7th-13th 2005, p.32-33

The government's intention is to enable all vulnerable people to live independently so that care homes are rendered obsolete. It is therefore promoting extracare housing for older people. Extracare housing offers self-contained flats or bungalows but with communal facilities, some meals provided, and personal care available in working hours.

EXPERIENCING TRAINING: THE NEED FOR A DETAILED INVESTIGATION

J. Flannery and others

Working with Older People, vol.9, Mar. 2005, p.13-16

There is a case for more widespread training in person-centred care amongst the staff of care homes for older people. Article reports on an evaluation of the AgeCare Awards, a new training scheme that gives emphasis to individualised care. Focuses on the reactions of the trainees and on some practical and management difficulties associated with the course.

EXPLAINING ABOUT … ADVOCACY AND CARE HOME RESIDENTS

F. Wright

Working with Older People, vol.9, Mar. 2005, p.9-12

There is a clear need for an independent advocacy service that can support care home residents in making complaints. A pilot study of local Age Concern advocacy schemes found that they lacked secure funding and could disappear over night. Author calls for an initiative to put in place a national network of advocacy schemes with secure funding.

"I'M LIKE A TREE A MILLION MILES FROM THE WATER'S EDGE": SOCIAL CARE AND INCLUSION OF OLDER PEOPLE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

J. Percival and J. Hanson

British Journal of Social Work: vol. 35, 2005, p.189 - 205

Study explores the neglected policy area of care of visually impaired older people and the links between unmet care needs and social exclusion. Drawing, through interviews conducted by age peers and focus groups, on the experiences of 400 visually impaired people aged over 55 in 3 English cities, article discusses needs assessment, concerns such as coping strategies, information and support needs, and service improvement. Authors propose greater interagency cooperation between social workers and professionals in allied fields to tackle the problems.

LIVING ON THE MARGINS: OLDER PEOPLE, PLACE AND SOCIAL EXCLUSION

P. Abbott and R. Sapsford

Policy Studies, vol. 26, 2005, p.29-46

Article contrasts the life experience of older people living in a deprived area of Middlesborough (Beckford) with that of older people living in affluent Waverly. Residents of Beckford experience high levels of crime, rely on poor public transport, and complain of a lack of locally provided services, including healthcare. Residents of affluent Waverly have cars and so control their own mobility, perceive their area as safe, and have easy access to services which in any case are available locally. In sum, residents of Beckford lack the personal control over their lives enjoyed by the affluent, and see themselves as powerless.

LIVING WITH DEMENTIA

J. Wallace

Mental Health Today, Apr. 2005, p.14-15

Today, more people with dementia receive support to enable them to live independently. Article describes a project in Dumfries and Galloway which aims to raise public awareness of dementia and train a range of frontline service providers in how to respond to people with the condition.

WILL CARE AT HOME REPLACE CARE HOMES?

T. Rice

Journal of Integrated Care, vol.13, Apr.2005, p.3-6

Discusses whether assistive technology can enable frail older people to maintain their independence and accomplish daily living tasks at home instead of going into residential care.

WHAT CHANCE OF A FREE FOR ALL?

C. Andrews

Community Care, Apr.21st-27th 2005, p.32-33

Summarises the policies of the Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties on free personal care for elderly people:

  • Labour and Conservatives would continue to offer free personal care to over-65s with assets of less than £20,000;
  • Conservatives would encourage people to take out insurance to cover costs of the first three years of personal care, after which the state would pay;
  • Liberal Democrats would bring in free personal care for the over-65s funded by a 50% tax on incomes over £100,000;
  • Conservatives would reduce costs by cutting the regulatory burden on care services;
  • Liberal Democrats would integrate the commissioning of health and social care within local government.
Search Welfare Reform on the Web