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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2005): Education - UK - Higher

THE DEATH OF SCIENCE?

S. Court

Public Finance, Mar.25th-31st 2005, p.24-26

There is concern about a swathe of closures of university science departments and a debate about whether government should intervene. Closures are prompted by reductions in student numbers, a drive to cut costs and incentives for universities to focus on departments achieving top research ratings.

DOES E-LEARNING POLICY DRIVE CHANGE IN HIGHER EDUCATION?: A CASE STUDY RELATING MODELS OF ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE TO E-LEARNING IMPLEMENTATION

S. de Freitas and M. Oliver

Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, vol.27, 2005, p.81-95

Paper begins by examining five models of organisational change: Fordist, evolutionary, ecological, community of practice and discourse-oriented. Then uses these perspectives to explore how e-learning drives both pedagogic and organisational change in a selected UK higher education institution.

DROWNING BY NUMBERS

D. MacLeod

Education Guardian, April 19th 2005, 20-21

Universities are gloomy about their finances even before they enter the uncharted waters of variable fees. Institutions face a 5% increase in their pay bills, with a 1% increase grant plus the uncertainty of variable fees. The article considers what will happen to public funding when fees come in.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT & CONTROL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

M. Prowle & E. Morgan

RoutledgeFalmer, 2005

There is no doubt that financial issues within higher education (HE) are of critical importance, and with the ongoing expansion of the HE sector, this emphasis on finance will continue to increase. This book explains the key issues in HE finance and financial management and provides practical guidance. It contains case materials, examples, and all the latest developments in financial management - from the macro-allocation of funding down to the management of individual budgets.

A RESEARCH-LED APPROACH TO ESTABLISHING FOUNDATION DEGREES

C. Smith and others

Research in Post-Compulsory Education, vol.10, 2005, p.27-38

Foundation degrees are designed with employer input to address skills shortages and to ensure a steady supply of suitably qualified people to meet the needs of the economy. Article describes the research approach undertaken by a higher education institution in the UK to explore employers' and employees' views on local skills, recruitment and training issues, and how these responses were used to develop a curriculum for foundation degrees.

UNIVERSITY EXPANSION FAILS TO HELP THE POOR

J. Boone

Financial Times, April 25th 2005, p.2

The huge expansion of places at universities has failed to help the poorest members of society. That is the finding of a study that also says Britain has the developed world's lowest social mobility. Researchers at the London School of Economics said pupils from poor backgrounds remained trapped in the worst schools while the wealthy went to university. The report found that the success of UK children was much more closely linked to their parents' income when they were growing up than those in Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark or Finland.

(See also The Daily Telegraph, April 25th 2005, p.1; The Independent, April 25th 2005, p.6)

WHY DEGREES COST MORE IN BRITAIN

A. Blair

The Times, April 15th 2005, p.12

Britain is the most expensive place in Europe to study in higher education and the third-most expensive in the Western world, according to a study by a North American think-tank. The research used a range of factors to measure affordability of higher education. The high cost of study in the UK is explained by Britain's high cost of living, lower average incomes and weak student grant programmes.

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