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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2000): Child Welfare - UK

ADOPTION HEADACHE FOR COUNCILS

D. Brindle

Guardian, Dec. 6th 1999, p. 2

Reports results of an unpublished government survey showing that almost 2500 children are waiting to be adopted from local authority care while 1300 families approved for adoption are waiting to be matched with a child. There is evidence that the pool of adopters is not being used because they are not able to cope with the special needs of the children social workers are trying to place.

BIRTH OF A NEW AGE?

B. Friend

Community Practitioner, vol. 72, 1999, p. 387-388

Discusses the prospects for improving services for children and families under the New Labour government. The key concern is whether resources will be available to translate the government's rhetoric into reality.

CHILD CARE THROUGH THE AGES

B. Kahan

Community Care, no. 1297, 1999, Supplement. 8p

Traces the evolution of child protection services and the care system for abused and neglected children in the UK.

ETHICS IN YOUTH WORK

S. Banks

Leicester: National Youth Agency, 1999

Discussion paper offers a draft statement of principles of a code of professional ethics for youth workers. The first part of the statement covers ethical principles relating to the way youth workers should treat young people, and the kind of values youth workers aim for. The second part covers 'professional principles' which relate more to the way youth workers should act in the role of practitioner with certain types of accountability and responsibility.

THE GOVERNMENT'S OBJECTIVE FOR CHILDREN'S SOCIAL SERVICES

Department of Health

London: 1999

Sets out governments objectives for children's social services. These include:

  • ensuring that children are securely attached to carers capable of providing safe and effective care throughout childhood;
  • ensuring that children are protected from abuse;
  • ensuring that children in need and looked after children gain maximum benefit from education, health and social care;
  • ensuring that young people leaving care are not isolated;
  • ensuring that children in regulated services are protected from harm and poor care standards;
  • ensuring that social care workers are appropriately trained.

A NEW DIRECTION

T. Burke

Young People Now, Jan. 2000, p.24-25

Describes a pilot scheme in Newcastle upon Tyne which developed a network of personal advisers to work with young people recognised as at risk of disaffection.

SEXUAL HEALING

A. Thompson

Community Care, no. 1298, 1999, p.30-31

Social workers will be expected to impart information and advice about sexual health to young people as part of the government's strategy to reduce the UK's high rates of teenage pregnancy.

A STEP INTO THE FUTURE

N. Huber

Community Care, no. 1300, 1999, p. 12

The Care Standards and Care Leavers Bills promised in this year's Queen's speech herald a breakthrough in provision for care leavers. While social workers applaud government aims, concerns are already emerging about how the new system will be funded and the pressures it puts on local authorities.

TEENAGE PREGNANCY AND THE FAMILY

London: Family Policy Studies Centre, 1999 (Family briefing paper; 9)

Argues that recent concern over teenage pregnancy is unfounded because the number of girls and young women becoming pregnant has not changed in the past 20 years. Teenage motherhood has only become an issue because these young parents cannot support themselves and are forced to rely on benefits. Sex education, access to abortion and moral disapproval are not sufficient to reduce teenage pregnancy, but tackling disadvantage and poor job prospects are crucial.

WE SHOULD ALL FEEL RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CHILDREN DUMPED IN CARE

Y. Alibhai-Brown

Independent, Nov. 25th 1999, p.4

Argues for an increased role for independent visitors in befriending children in care.

THE YOUTH SUPPORT SERVICE

B. Chatrik

Working Brief, issue 109, 1999, p. 17-18

The government proposes a much closer working relationship, and possibly merger, between the careers and youth services and education welfare services. The comprehensive Youth Support Service so formed would have as its main function tackling the social exclusion of young people currently missing out on opportunities. It would provide support, advice and advocacy for young people through Personal Advisers.

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