Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

This fantasy novel of 1865 was originally entitled Alice’s Adventures Under Ground. It was written by the Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, using the pseudonym Lewis Carroll (1832 – 1898). The tale was first told by Carroll on 4 July 1862, to the three young daughters of Henry Liddell, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, on a river boat trip. The children, especially Alice, adored the story and begged Carroll to write it down. It took him until February 1863 to write out the whole text, taking great pains to write in neat ‘manuscript print’, designed for the young Alice to read. Once the text was complete, Carroll began to add the illustrations which give a charming impression of his own vision of Wonderland and its inhabitants.

The author gradually revised and expanded the tale, publishing it with illustrations by John Tenniel. Carroll’s iconoclastic book is underpinned by encounters with talking animals, magic potions, problems with scale and nonsensical ideas. 

'Alice's Adventures Under Ground', the original manuscript version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures Under Ground', the original manuscript version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland [folio: 1r]

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Creator:
Lewis Carroll
Published:
1865
Full title:
Alice in Wonderland
Forms:
Prose
Genre:
Victorian Literature
Literary period:
Victorian

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