Improving services for young people: an economic perspective

Improving services for young people: an economic perspective
Document type
Report
Author(s)
Shaheen, Faiza; Kersley, Helen
Publisher
New Economics Foundation
Date of publication
6 April 2011
Subject(s)
Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business, Management & leadership: including strategy, public sector management, operations and production
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This report, commissioned by Catch 22, attempts to measure and value how greater coherence and responsiveness in young people's services would contribute to potentially better outcomes for young people and society. Currently, public services do not deal effectively with this life stage. At the ages of 16, 17 and 18 many of the better targeted and coordinated services for children fall away, often leaving young people who lack support from their families both vulnerable and struggling. An estimated 200,000 young people find themselves locked into destructive cycles, with long-term consequences for their economic, physical and emotional wellbeing and substantial costs for the state as a result of their ill-health and their dependence on welfare.

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