Job creation: lessons from abroad

Job creation: lessons from abroad
Document type
Paper
Author(s)
Silim, Amna
Publisher
TUC
Date of publication
1 July 2013
Series
Touchstone Pamphlets. Extra
Subject(s)
People management: all aspects of managing people, Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This report looks at the international experience of employment change since the recession, at how the British experience compares with other countries and at the lessons we can learn from this comparison. Given the depth of the recession and the feeble recovery, we might have expected unemployment to rise by a million more than it actually did. There is no consensus among economists about why this should be the case, but one strong explanation has been the shift to “activation” policies by successive governments and reforms by the last government to ‘make work pay’, including the introduction of the minimum wage and tax credits. Suggestions that the de-regulation of the UK labour market is responsible for this performance are more contentious, with international comparisons not showing much of a relationship between labour market flexibility and job losses during the recent recession.

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