Mini-jobs: learning the wrong German lessons

Mini-jobs: learning the wrong German lessons
Document type
Briefing
Corporate author(s)
Trade Union Congress
Publisher
TUC
Date of publication
1 October 2012
Subject(s)
People management: all aspects of managing people
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This report argues that the German scheme of mini-jobs, hailed by some commentators as the answer to the British 'broken' jobs market, is a solution to specific German problems, which do not afflict the British labour market. According to the report, the impact of mini-jobs on unemployment in Germany has been exaggerated in British news stories, which have not reported the link to problems like increased involuntary part-time working. Instead, continues the report, 'mini-jobs' looks like a variation on a well know theme: using the recession to justify weaker rights for workers. What Britain needs is a policy that raises wages to stimulate demand and an end to austerity. There are lessons to be learned from Germany, especially about industrial policy, but Britain doesn't need to import mini-jobs.

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