More and better apprenticeships needed

More and better apprenticeships needed
Document type
Briefing
Author(s)
Rowan, Kevin
Publisher
TUC
Date of publication
3 February 2012
Subject(s)
People management: all aspects of managing people, Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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Written on the eve of the Apprenticeship Week 2012, this briefing note reports terrific growth rates in apprenticeships in the north east of England.  However, argues the note, these apprenticeship numbers represent just 7.1 apprentices per 1000 employees, higher than some areas, but lower than the national average of 8.9. Employer engagement could also be much better, around only one in ten employers started an apprentice last year. There is also a mismatch between priority sectors, those that offer the best potential for economic development in the next few years, and apprenticeship growth. Finally, there has been much debate about the quality of apprenticeships, with some providers offering short-term, work-based training courses and calling them apprentices, and not enough apprenticeships leading to level 3 and above qualification outcomes.

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