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Detailed record for Arundel 222

Author Bede, William of Malmesbury, Gregory of Tours, and others
Title Prose Vita sancti Cuthberti (ff. 1-34v), two miracles from the Historia ecclesiastica, De gestis pontificum Anglorum, the miracles of Andrew
Origin England, N.?
Date last quarter of the 12th century
Language Latin
Script Protogothic, written above top line
Decoration 1 large initial in blue with red and green penwork decoration (f. 1). Other large simple initials in yellow, blue, red, or green; 2 with penwork decoration in another colour (ff. 84v, 146), another in two colours (f. 135v). Some decorated quire signatures and marginal annotations.
Dimensions in mm 225 x 155 (170 x 125) in two columns
Official foliation ff. 166 (+ unfoliated modern paper flyleaves)
Collation i-xviii8 (ff. 1-144), xix4 (ff. 145-148), xx8 (ff. 149-156), xxi10 (ff. 157-166).
Form Parchment codex
Binding BM/BL in-house. Rebound in 1962.
Provenance Inscribed '177', '93' and 'Beda' (f. 1).
? Thomas Howard (b. 1585, d. 1646), 2nd earl of Arundel, 4th earl of Surrey, and 1st earl of Norfolk, art collector and politician.
Henry Howard (b. 1628, d. 1684), 6th duke of Norfolk, presented to the Royal Society in 1667.
The Royal Society, London (its ink stamp: 'Soc. Reg. Lond. / ex dono HENR. HOWARD / Norfolciensis', f. 1).
Purchased by the British Museum from the Royal Society of London together with 549 other Arundel manuscripts in 1831.
Notes Numerous 17th and 18th-century marginal inscriptions.
St Cuthbert was a seventh-century, English Christian leader, renowned for his ascetic practices and the miracles attributed to him during his lifetime and posthumously. Born in Northumbria around 635, he entered the monastery of Melrose in 651, and later became guest-master at the newly founded monastery at Ripon. Cuthbert subsequently became prior of Melrose, then prior of Lindisfarne, and went on to live as a hermit on the island of Inner Farne, off the coast of Northumberland. He was consecrated as bishop of Lindisfarne in 685 but died at his Inner Farne hermitage on 20 March 687.

He was elevated to sainthood in 698 when his body was reinterred in a new wooden coffin. This coffin was subsequently removed from Lindisfarne by the community of St Cuthbert and was carried with them as they travelled around the North East in the wake of Viking raids in the ninth and tenthh centuries. At the end of the tenth century, the community took Cuthbert's coffin with them to Durham and settled there.

In 1104, Cuthbert's coffin was opened and the gospel was discovered inside with the saint's body, which was reburied at the East end of the new Norman cathedral. He was one of England's most popular and widely venerated saints both in the Anglo-Saxon period and after the Norman Conquest, and his shrine was a major medieval pilgrimage centre.
Select bibliography Catalogue of Manuscripts in The British Museum, New Series, 1 vol. in 2 parts (London: British Museum, 1834-1840), I, part I: The Arundel Manuscripts, p. 64.

Bertram Colgrave, Two Lives of Saint Cuthbert: A Life by an Anonymous Monk of Lindisfarne and Bede's Prose Life (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1940), p. 29, no. 17 (as 'Ar1').


Images
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Decorated initial

f. 1
Decorated initial
Detail

f. 1
Detail
Coloured initials

f. 36
Coloured initials
 

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