A Millinery Establishment proved to be a House of Ill Fame

Description

This small pamphlet was published in the mid-19th century by the Society for the Protection of Females as a warning to parents sending their daughters into work. It claims to have discovered a ‘millinery establishment’ (a shop devoted to making hats that primarily employed women and girls) secretly operating as a brothel. This discovery is told through the tragic story of a clergyman’s daughter who unknowingly joins the house, is raped, and, before she can be saved by her parents, is found dead.

Full title:
A Millinery Establishment proved to be a House of Ill Fame: Thoughts for Parents. Or Why Should Not Such Houses Be Exposed. Being a true exposure of a Private House of Ill fame in Gravesend.
Published:
estimated 1840, probably London
Format:
Pamphlet
Creator:
Society for the Protection of Females
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
8416.a.64.

Full catalogue details

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Article by:
Judith Flanders
Themes:
London, Poverty and the working classes, Gender and sexuality

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