'A Scene in Kensington Gardens – or, Fashion and Frights of 1829', from George Cruikshank's Scraps and Sketches

Description

George Cruikshank (1792–1878) was, from the 1820s onwards, one of Britain’s most renowned satirical illustrators. His subjects included politicians, the anti-slavery movement, royalty and observations of everyday life.

This hand-tinted drawing comes from a collection called Scraps and Sketches, an annual series of collected drawings published by Cruikshank himself in the four years between 1829 and 1832. Each consisted of six plates, with several designs on each. Though not financially successful, the series confirmed his status as a leading humourist; pirated copies of its contents appeared, much to the artist’s frustration.

Subtitled ‘Fashion and Frights of 1829’, this image depicts a scene in Kensington Gardens, where London’s wealthy young people would parade the latest fashions. Tiny waists were evidently desirable for both sexes, and the women’s precariously large hats, voluminous sleeves and abundant ringlets are contrasted to the men’s over-sculpted hairstyles and beards.

Full title:
'A Scene in Kensington Gardens – or, Fashion and Frights of 1829', from Scraps and Sketches
Published:
1828, 1829, London
Format:
Book / Print / Image
Creator:
George Cruikshank
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
L.R.410.pp.24.

Full catalogue details

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