Advertisement in the London Daily Post, 'Any persons disposed to buy a Negro', 1740

Description

This advertisement from a London newspaper published in 1740 reveals the shocking attitudes to enslaved Africans in Georgian society. Two African children aged just 14 and eight are offered for sale as domestic servants, as if they are unwanted household items.

Plantations growing sugar, tobacco, coffee and cotton were labour intensive and relatively unsophisticated operations that boomed from the 17th century onwards owing to the growing demand for luxury goods in Europe. However, manpower in North and South America and the West Indies was scarce, with farm workers difficult to find and expensive to employ. Merchants turned instead to enslaved Africans as a source of unfree, forced labour. Millions of Africans were shipped from Africa to the Americas, a route known as the Middle Passage, to work in brutal conditions on the plantations, with raw materials and processed goods shipped back to Europe in ever-increasing quantities.

Full title:
'Any persons disposed to buy a Negro'
Published:
13 September 1740, London
Format:
Newspaper / Advertisement / Ephemera
Creator:
Usage terms

© Gale

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
17th-18th century Burney Collection Newspapers Z2000626667

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