Alfred Tennyson's notes on A New Study of Tennyson

Description

In this extract we see Alfred Lord Tennyson interacting with a work of criticism on his own poetry. Throughout his career Tennyson found critics and reviewers particularly irksome. Here, to a rather comic effect, he has written 'not known to me', 'Nonsense!' and a large question mark next to several points in the critic's argument. It serves as a reminder of the fallibility of critics, and our own interpretation of literature.

Full title:
Alfred Tennyson's notes on A New Study of Tennyson
Format:
Book / Manuscript annotation
Creator:
Alfred Lord Tennyson
Copyright:
© Tennyson Research Centre (Lincolnshire County Council)
Held by:
Tennyson Research Centre (Lincolnshire County Council)

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