Amendments to the Human Medicines Regulations 2012: 'hub and spoke' dispensing, prices of medicines on dispensing labels, labelling requirements and pharmacists' exemption: consultation document

Document type
Other
Corporate author(s)
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publisher
Department of Health
Date of publication
1 March 2016
Subject(s)
Health Services
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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This consultation seeks views on proposed changes to medicines legislation.

These changes are to:

  • Allow independent pharmacists to make use of ‘hub and spoke’ dispensing models - a ‘hub’ pharmacy dispenses medicines on a large scale, often by making use of automation, preparing and assembling the medicines for regular ‘spoke’ pharmacies that supply the medicines to the patient.
  • Allow the price of medicines and a statement on how the costs of medicines are met to be published on dispensing labels should this be required for NHS medicines dispensed as part of the NHS pharmaceutical services.
  • Clarify the current dispensing label requirements for monitored dosage systems and medicines supplied under patient group directions.
  • Amend the pharmacists’ exemption in section 10 of the Medicines Act, regarding the preparation and assembly of medicines, following a judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

The consultation runs from the 22nd March to the 17th May 2016.

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