An Avalanche in the Alps, a sublime landscape painting by Philip James De Loutherbourg

Description

The Alps were a familiar landscape for generations of British travellers, but it was only in the later part of the 18th century that their rugged and immense qualities were appreciated for their Sublime associations. Here Philip James de Loutherbourg, who specialised in such landscapes, adds human drama to the avalanche’s awesome progress via the terrified people (foreground) soon to be overwhelmed by nature’s power. De Loutherbourg’s exploration of sublime effect was assisted by his work as a theatre set designer. He also created the ‘Eidophusikon’, a miniature theatre where landscapes were animated and accompanied by music and sound effects.

© Tate, 2014

Full title:
An Avalanche in the Alps
Created:
1803
Format:
Artwork / Image
Creator:
Philip James De Loutherbourg
Copyright:
© Tate
Usage terms

© Tate

Held by
Tate
Shelfmark:
T00772

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