Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill [HL]. Vol. 3, Evidence - individual submissions

Document type
Report
Corporate author(s)
Great Britain. Parliament. House of Lords. Select Committee on the Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill
Publisher
TSO
Date of publication
4 April 2005
Series
House of Lords paper, session 2004/05; 86
Subject(s)
Legislation, Health Services
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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The Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill of 2004/05 sought to legalise, for people who were terminally ill, who were mentally competent and who were suffering unbearably, medical assistance with suicide or, in cases where the person concerned would be physically incapable of taking the final action to end his or her life, voluntary euthanasia. The Committee examined both the principles underlying the Bill and its practical implications if it were to become law. It also looked at the experience of other countries which have enacted legislation of this nature, and in addition made some analysis of public opinion in Britain on the subject.

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