Attitudes to obesity: findings from the 2015 British Social Attitudes survey

Document type
Survey
Author(s)
Curtice, John
Publisher
NatCen Social Research
Date of publication
1 September 2016
Series
British Social Attitudes; Obesity
Subject(s)
Health Services, Social Policy
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

Download (966KB )

This paper presents new findings on attitudes in Britain towards obesity and what might be done to reduce its prevalence.

Despite appreciating some of the health risks, people tend not to recognise obesity when it does exist – and especially so in men.

Key findings:

  • People tend to overestimate what obesity means in terms of body size.
  • There is widespread understanding of some, but not all, of the health risks.
  • People who are obese are often the object of stigmatising attitudes.

Obesity is frequently regarded as a problem for individuals and health care professionals rather than society more generally, and those who are obese are often stigmatised. There is significant support for actions aimed at reducing levels of obesity.

Related to NatCen Social Research

Parents experiences of claiming the childcare element of Universal Credit

Report on parents experiences of claiming childcare

Changing patterns in parental time use in the UK

Briefing paper on parenting in the UK

Suicide and self-harm in Britain: researching risk and resilience

Report on self-harm and suicide prevention work

Inequalities in health and service use among people with borderline intellectual impairment

This report presents a profile of people with borderline intellectual impairment

More items related to this publisher