'Britannia Rules The Waves'

Description

What is this?

The start of the First World War saw the publication of large amounts of supportive, patriotic ephemera designed to appeal to the market of war supporters. This postcard uses powerful British colonial troops – sea-power, imperial songs and the Union Jack – and overlays them onto something peculiarly Canadian – a birch bark scene. Birch bark scenes are still common in Canadian arts and crafts, harking back to Wiigwaasabak (birch scrolls) used by First Nations people to illustrate geometrical patterns and shapes. In this postcard then we can see the birch effect as a Canadian base over which British colonial messages are overlaid.

Full title:
Britannia rules the waves. With design of birch bark scene, flag and motto. Photographer: Walter John Ingram.
Published:
1914
Publisher:  
Walter John Ingram
Created:
1914
Format:
Postcard / Illustration
Language:
English
Creator:
Walter John Ingram
Copyright:
© Patent and Copyright Office, Library and Archives Canada
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
HS85/10/29331

Full catalogue details

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