Broadside about a 12 year old boy sentenced to death

Description

This broadside illustrates the growing concerns that existed among members of elite society regarding juvenile delinquency in the early part of the 19th century. The publication describes the life of a 12-year-old boy who was drawn into crime ‘through the corrupt example of wicked parents’, and who was regularly caught stealing from his masters since the age of seven. Later the boy joins a gang of thieves who send him down a chimney as part of an elaborate plan to rob a jeweller’s shop.  

The authenticity of the case referred to is unclear. A young boy of the same name does not appear in the court records from the Old Bailey, and it is possible that the piece was used as a rhetorical device by supporters of moral reform to highlight the crimes of boys and girls generally. The text of the broadside was certainly recycled in similar publications in the early years of the 19th century. The name of the juvenile defendant was simply changed by the author when referring to different cases currently in the public eye.

Full title:
The dreadful life and confession of Thomas Mitchel, a boy 12 years of age, who was tried on five different indictments, and condemned to die at the Old Bailey, etc.
Published:
estimated 1829, probably London
Format:
Broadside / Ephemera
Creator:
Unknown
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
74/1881.d.8(16)

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