Broadside satirising the government and monarchy

Description

Broadsides were mass-produced sheets of text and images, often sold in the streets, and functioned as a quick and easy way of disseminating information in the early 19th century. Popular subjects were politics, crime, and religion.

This broadside, printed around 1828, satirises the government and the monarchy; easily recognisable are George IV (top left), the Duke of Wellington (prime minister, top right) and Sir Robert Peel (home secretary, bottom centre).

Full title:
Grand Gallery. Portraits of the household servants at the George Inn Windsor
Published:
estimated 1828, London
Format:
Broadside / Ephemera / Illustration / Image
Creator:
Unknown
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
1875.d.7.(26.)

Related articles

Street literature

Article by:
Ruth Richardson
Themes:
Popular culture, Reading and print culture

From public notes and broadsides to catchpennies and printed songs, Dr Ruth Richardson examines the variety of street literature which informed and entertained the public before newspapers were readily available.

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