Cancer survival by NHS England Area Team: patients diagnosed 1996-2011, followed up to 2012

Document type
Report
Corporate author(s)
Great Britain. Office for National Statistics
Publisher
Office for National Statistics
Date of publication
10 December 2013
Subject(s)
Health Services
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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This report presents one-year and five-year age-standardised net survival estimates for the 25 NHS England Area Teams, for patients who were diagnosed with a cancer of the oesophagus, stomach, colon, lung, breast (women) or cervix during 1996–2011 and followed up to 31 December 2012. One-year survival estimates are reported for patients diagnosed in 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011, and five-year survival for those diagnosed in 1996, 2001 and 2006.

The key findings are: one-year net survival from cancers of the oesophagus, stomach, colon, lung, breast (women), and cervix has improved by between 3% and 19% for adults diagnosed in England in 2011, compared to those diagnosed in 1996; five-year net survival for these same cancers has improved by between 2% and 9% for adults diagnosed in 2006, compared to those diagnosed in 1996; for women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011, there was very little variation in one-year survival across the 25 NHS England Area Teams: the national average value was 96.4%, and the range between the highest and lowest values was only 1.3%; for five-year survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006, the geographic variation around the national average (84.1%) was slightly wider, at 4.0%; and disparities in net survival across the 25 NHS England Area Teams were highest for one-year net survival for cancers of the oesophagus (men), stomach, colon (women) and lung (women) in 2011, with differences of over 10% between Area Teams - these disparities were less marked for five-year net survival.