Care Act 2014 part 1 factsheet 6: The Care Act: reforming how people pay for their care and support

Document type
Other
Corporate author(s)
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publisher
Department of Health
Date of publication
1 October 2014
Subject(s)
Social Work, Social Care and Social Services
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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The Care Act received Royal Assent on 14 May 2014. This means the Care Act is now law. This factsheet has been produced to accompany Part 1 of the Act and will come into force on 1 April 2015. This factsheet describes how the Act establishes the new capped costs system from April 2016. This will end the unfairness and fear caused by unlimited care costs, and will mean that people with more modest assets receive more support from the State.

The cap on care costs will reassure many people by providing protection from catastrophic care costs if they have the most serious needs. It is intended that the cap will be £72,000 when it is introduced in April 2016. The Government will also provide new financial help to those with modest wealth. This will ensure that people with the least money get the most support. Currently, only people with less than £23,250 in assets and low incomes receive help from the State with their care and support costs. Our changes will mean that people with around £118,000 worth of assets (savings or property), or less, will start to receive financial support if they need to go to a care home. The amount that the Government will pay towards someone’s care and support costs will depend on what assets a person has.

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