Commercial correspondence from Mosul

Description

Jeremiah Shamer, a book merchant, wrote this letter about the sale of religious books in both Arabic (top) and Modern Assyrian (also called Swadaya) (below). 

The letter is part of a larger body of correspondence and poetry penned by the late Mr. Shamer, all of which speaks to the social, religious and economic life of Iraq's Assyrian Christians in the late 19th century.

The writer used riq’a, a form of Arabic that requires minimal lifting of pen from paper, perhaps because of time pressures around the sale. The Assyrian text features a similar fast style for the Syriac script. 

Full title:
Commercial correspondence from Mosul
Published:
Mosul
Created:
1881
Format:
Letter
Language:
Arabic / Assyrian
Creator:
Jeremiah Shamer
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Or. 9326

Full catalogue details

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