Defence against Foreign Invasion

Description

British responses to the French Revolution were at first mixed. Some political figures such as Charles James Fox celebrated events in France as a victory for liberty, while others such as William Pitt greeted the revolution with ambivalence. Radical political groups in Britain took strength from events across the channel and organised themselves on formal lines in order to campaign for parliamentary reform.

When France declared war on Britain in 1793 however the mood of the country changed. Fearful of domestic insurrection and a French invasion, the government began clamping down on radical movements at home by repressing political assemblies and the issuing of seditious words. Home-grown patriotism was meanwhile roused by anti-French sentiments which helped to foster a wave of loyalism in Britain. Huge armies of amateur volunteers came together to create a force of nearly 400,000 men by 1800, ready to repel an invasion at a moment’s notice.

Full title:
Defence against Foreign Invasion. In order to prevent any mis-apprehension of the measure taken for the defence of the kingdom against a French invasion, all true friends to their country are desired to remark, that by the act lately passed, a force of sixty thousand men will be ready in case of necessity, [etc.]
Published:
estimated 1796, probably London
Format:
Pamphlet
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
RB.23.a.11208

Full catalogue details

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