The case for enabling talented, young, disabled graduates to realise their potential and reach the top

Cover image
Document type
Discussion paper
Author(s)
Shinkwin, Kevin; Relph, George
Publisher
Demos
Date of publication
1 July 2019
Subject(s)
Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This discussion paper reflects on the experiences of disabled graduates in the UK.

In order to level the playing field for disabled graduates, this paper calls for improvement for disabled people in the following areas; Accessible housing, accessible transport, transparency reporting, equal access to goods and services and a strategic and accountable oversight body.

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