The learning curve: how the UK is harnessing the potential of online learning: report summary

Cover image
Document type
Summary
Author(s)
Glover, Ben; Lasko-Skinner, Rose; Ussher, Kitty
Publisher
Demos
Date of publication
1 February 2020
Subject(s)
Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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Demos polled 20,000 people in the biggest report of its kind looking at online learning habits and their impact on people’s lives in the UK. That research was paired with in depth interviews with both individuals who have used the online learning to achieve career and personal goals and those who have not engaged in online learning, and a review of existing academic literature.

The research found that 10% of the UK’s economy output can be linked to online learning.

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