Destination of Business and Administrative Studies students after graduation. Analysis of Department for Education and HESA data

Destination of Business and Administrative Studies students after graduation. Analysis of Department for Education and HESA data
Document type
Report
Corporate author(s)
Chartered Association of Business Schools
Publisher
Chartered Association of Business Schools
Date of publication
5 January 2017
Subject(s)
Management & leadership: including strategy, public sector management, operations and production, People management: all aspects of managing people
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This report looks at the employment outcomes of students who graduated with a Business degree from UK University Business Schools between 2003 and 2013, the most recent data available when the report was written (in late 2016). 

It is based on analysis of a study published by the Department of Education, which used experimental LEO (Longitudinal Education Outcomes) data, plus Higher Education Statistical Authority (HESA) data about the position of graduates when entering employment.

Key findings include:

  • For every year between 2003/2004 to 2012/2013, at least 72.9% of Business and Administrative Studies graduates were in sustained work one year after graduation. There were never more than two subject areas with a higher proportion of graduates in sustained work (one year after graduation), than Business and Administrative studies. 
  • For every year between 2003/2004 and 2010/2011, at least 4 in 5 Business and Administrative studies graduates were in sustained work 3 years after graduation, consistently the highest or second highest proportion of any subject area.
  • For every year between 2003/2004 and 2008/2009, Business and Administrative studies always had the highest proportion of graduates in sustained work 5 years after graduation, with at least 83%.
  • For graduates of the 2003/2004 year, approximately 9 in 10 on Business and Administrative studies courses were in sustained work ten years after graduation, a higher proportion than any other subject.

The report authors conclude that the evidence shows that over the past ten years, UK Business Schools have consistently succeeded in giving their students the skills and qualifications they need to enter and succeed in the workplace.

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