Economic governance and poverty reduction in South Korea

Economic governance and poverty reduction in South Korea
Document type
Working Paper
Author(s)
Henderson, Jeffrey; Hulme, David; Phillips, Richard
Publisher
Manchester Business School
Date of publication
1 September 2002
Series
University of Manchester Business School Working Papers. No. 439
Subject(s)
Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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This paper examines the links between economic governance, viewed as the structure and practice of economic policy making and management, and poverty elimination efforts in the Republic of Korea (South Korea). In the research linking economic growth to state institutional capacities for economic governance, South Korea has emerged as one of the exemplary cases. Among the factors that have led to its extraordinary growth record since the late 1960s, governance capacities (including bureaucratic competence) seem to have been decisive (Evans and Rauch 1999, Rauch and Evans 2000). The line of research broached by Evans and Rauch is extended by examining the relation of South Korea's capacities for economic governance to the incidence of poverty and inequality there.

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