Etruscan alphabet from inscriptions

Description

Greek colonists took the alphabet to Italy, where the Etruscans changed it to suit their needs. These 16th-century notes contain one of the earliest attempts to decipher their language, extinct since the 1st century AD. They present a list of Etruscan letters collected from newly-excavated objects. 

Written right to left, some letters are instantly recognisable, including the first three examples of a letter ‘A’.

Full title:
Archaeological notes and treatises from the 16th-17th centuries
Created:
1552-1717, Siena
Format:
Manuscript
Language:
Italian / Spanish
Usage terms

Public Domain in most countries other than the UK.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Sloane MS 3524

Full catalogue details

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