European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Description

The European Convention on Human Rights is a pan-European treaty, drafted by a committee of the Council of Europe in which the British Conservative politician and lawyer, David Maxwell Fyfe (1900-67), played an instrumental role . Ratified in 1950 and in force since 1953, the Convention provides the first collective commitment of states to comply with the obligations outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Some of its statements, though distilled through time, relate to key clauses in Magna Carta. For example, Articles 5 and 6(1) of the Convention, which address individual freedoms and legal rights, reassert principles found in clauses 39–40 of the 1215 Magna Carta. The Convention states that, ‘Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be deprived of his liberty save … in accordance with a procedure prescribed by law.’ The Convention established the European Court of Human Rights which enforces its terms.

Full title:
European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
Published:
1953
Format:
Report
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
B.S. Ref 1 (UK Cmd 8969 Treaty Series no. 71, vol. XXIX.89)

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