Gambling behaviour in England & Scotland: headline findings from the Health Survey for England 2012 and Scottish Health Survey 2012

Document type
Report
Author(s)
Seabury, Carla; Wardle, Heather
Publisher
NatCen Social Research
Date of publication
15 April 2014
Subject(s)
Social Policy
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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The purpose of this report is to provide a brief statistical bulletin of gambling prevalence in England and Scotland, using data from the Health Survey for England 2012 and Scottish Health Survey 2012. Findings focus on: participation in gambling; problem gambling prevalence; the prevalence of gamblers at low and moderate risk of harm..

Estimates of problem and at-risk gambling are provided according to two different measurement instruments, the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) and the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI). According to the DSM-IV, problem gambling prevalence among adults living in private households in England and Scotland was 0.5%. Men were more likely than women to be classified as a problem gambler according to the DSM-IV (0.8% and 0.1% respectively). According to the PGSI, problem gambling prevalence among adults in England and Scotland was 0.4%, with men again being more likely than women to be classified as a problem gambler (0.7% and 0.1% respectively).

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