Goodyear Patent, 1855

Description

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1855 Goodyear Patent

GB Patent 2567 of 1855 awarded to Charles Goodyear (42, Avenue Gabrielle, Paris) for:
“IMPROVEMENTS IN SHOES AND BOOTS WHEN INDIA-RUBBER IS USED”.

This patent describes various methods of manufacturing the uppers of boots and shoes using combinations of materials including India-rubber and leather.

The two advantages of the footwear manufactured using this method are that:
The exterior is waterproof.
The footwear is ventilated.

A ‘shoemaker’s last’ is a holding device shaped like a human foot that is used to fashion or repair shoes. A ‘corrugated last’ is used in this invention to create corrugated uppers made from the india-rubber & leather combination.

These corrugated uppers are then perforated with numerous small holes allowing for the free circulation of air from the interior of the shoe or boot; at the same time, any moisture falling on the exterior of the uppers will be conducted away by the channels between the corrugations.

This results in the production of footwear with a waterproof exterior and an interior with numerous perforations allowing the free circulation of air to ventilate the upper parts of the feet.


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Full title:
GB Patent 2567 of 1855 awarded to Charles Goodyear (42, Avenue Gabrielle, Paris) for: “IMPROVEMENTS IN SHOES AND BOOTS WHEN INDIA-RUBBER IS USED”.
Published:
Sealed 25 November 1856, dated 14 November 1855, London
Format:
Patent
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Patent 1855 No 2567

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