Growing up North: consultation with children and young people

Document type
Consultation
Author(s)
Longfield, Anne
Publisher
Children's Commissioner for England
Date of publication
1 March 2018
Subject(s)
Children and Young People, Community Development and Regeneration, Social Policy
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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This research highlights significant differences between boys and girls, both in how they perceive their local area, and in terms of what they want to do in the future. Overall, it finds that boys were more positive about the opportunities available to them and were also more positive about the future. Girls were less optimistic, this may be because they didn’t see regeneration as providing jobs for them. This research suggests that girls’ ambitions needs to be a particular focus, both to persuade them of the merits of jobs in engineering, and also to stress that regeneration means more than manufacturing.

The Northern Powerhouse has put a spotlight on the economic regeneration of the north of England. It must now put the spotlight on children.

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