High Pay Centre briefing: executive pay at FTSE 100 companies that are not accredited living wage employers

Cover image
Document type
Report
Corporate author(s)
High Pay Centre
Publisher
High Pay Centre
Date of publication
1 November 2018
Subject(s)
People management: all aspects of managing people, Management & leadership: including strategy, public sector management, operations and production
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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Living wage week (commencing 5 November) promotes the ‘real living wage’, the minimum hourly rate necessary to give workers and their families a decent standard of living (currently set at £10.20 per hour in London and £8.25 in the rest of the UK).

This research from the High Pay Centre think tank finds that some of Britain's biggest companies are paying their top executives millions while denying their staff a living wage.

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