Robocalypse now? why we shouldn't panic about automation, algorithms and artificial intelligence

Cover image
Document type
Paper
Author(s)
Shackleton, Len
Publisher
Institute of Economic Affairs
Date of publication
1 May 2018
Series
Current Controversies No. 62
Subject(s)
Trends: economic, social and technology trends affecting business
Collection
Business and management
Material type
Reports

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There is growing concern that innovative technologies threaten jobs on an unprecedented scale.

This paper examines the plausibility and then considers the prospects for new occupational roles being created to replace old jobs.

The paper also critically examines new policy proposals for a 'robot tax'.

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