Immigration by category: workers, students, family members, asylum applicants

Document type
Briefing
Author(s)
Blinder, Scott
Publisher
Migration Observatory, The
Date of publication
1 June 2012
Subject(s)
Minority Groups
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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This briefing examines immigration by category; the analysis distinguishes between European and non-European migrants and among four basic types: work, study, family, and asylum. The key points outlined in the briefing include: an estimated 54.5% of immigrants to the UK in 2010 were non-EU nationals; students make up the largest and fastest-growing category of immigrants; work and family migration from outside the EU have both declined since 2005; asylum applicants represent a declining share of migration to the UK in the last decade, down to about 3% of migration to the UK in 2010; and, administrative data sources and ONS estimates mostly agree on the share of migrants in each category, though administrative sources give higher raw figures than ONS estimates.

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