Inventory of sale for a Tobagan estate listing names and prices of enslaved people

Description

This document relates to the sale of the Studley-Park plantation located in the parish of St George on the island of Tobago. The plantation was sold for John Robley by auction at Garraways Coffee House in London on 30 September 1772. The printed document indicates that Robely owned approximately 590 acres of land and over a hundred enslaved children, women and men.

Robely was one of many absentee landlords in the Caribbean who accumulated enormous wealth from afar. As was typical of British landlords, Robely broke up the estate among his heirs who continued to cultivate the plantation into the late 19th century. Records indicate that over 40 years later, in 1819, the plantation included nearly 200 enslaved people.

Full title:
Particulars and conditions of sale, of all that plantation, or freehold estate, called Studley-Park, situate in the parish of Saint George, in the island of Tobago ... 
Published:
1773, London
Format:
Printed catalogue
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
C.190.b.1

Full catalogue details

Related articles

An introduction to the Caribbean, empire and slavery

Article by:
David Lambert
Theme:
Waves of history

After the Caribbean was first colonised by Spain in the 15th century, a system of sugar planting and enslavement evolved. David Lambert explores how this system changed the region, and how enslaved people continued to resist colonial rule.

In Praise of Love and Children: Beryl Gilroy’s arrival story

Article by:
Sandra Courtman
Themes:
Exploring identity, Gender and sexuality, Literature 1950–2000

Written in 1959 but not published until 1996, In Praise of Love and Children is a rare account of a woman’s experience of migration from the Caribbean. Sandra Courtman examines the challenges that Gilroy faced as a writer, before focussing on how her novel engages with memory, family and the traumatic legacies of slavery as its heroine establishes a new life in London.

In Praise of Love and Children: Beryl Gilroy’s arrival story

Article by:
Sandra Courtman
Themes:
The arrivants, Authors, artists and activists

Written in 1959 but not published until 1996, In Praise of Love and Children is a rare account of a woman’s experience of migration from the Caribbean. Sandra Courtman examines the challenges that Gilroy faced as a writer, before focussing on how her novel engages with memory, family and the traumatic legacies of slavery as its heroine establishes a new life in London.

Related collection items