An investigation into inequalities in adult lifespan

Document type
Report
Author(s)
Mayhew, Les; Smith, David
Publisher
International Longevity Centre - UK
Date of publication
3 May 2016
Subject(s)
Poverty Alleviation Welfare Benefits and Financial Inclusion, Social Policy
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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Despite huge increases in life expectancy, the gap between rich and poor is increasing for the first time since the 1870s, according to this new report from Cass Business School, City University London and the ILC-UK.

This report, an investigation into inequalities in adult lifespan, by Professor Les Mayhew and Dr. David Smith, finds that unhealthy lifestyles are the main causes of this widening gap.

The report finds:

  • That five per cent of men in Britain that have attained the age of 30 are living to an average of 96 years-old – 33.3 years longer than the lowest 10 per cent.
  • In women, the longest surviving are reaching 98.2 years-old, 31 years longer than the lowest.
  • Men in lower socio-economic groups are most likely to make damaging lifestyle choices.

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