Must do better: spending on schools

Document type
Report
Author(s)
Thorpe, Lauren; Trewhitt, Kimberley; Zuccollo, James
Publisher
Reform
Date of publication
1 May 2013
Series
Reform ideas; no.5
Subject(s)
Education and Skills
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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The schools budget in England has been ring-fenced since 2010-11. Ministers’ justification for higher school spending can only be that higher spending leads to better outcomes. Reform has therefore carried out an extensive comparison between funding and results. The results showed that there was no correlation at all between spending and outcomes. On a fair comparison, for both primary and secondary schools, some schools were spending more than twice as much as other schools to achieve the same outcomes in value-added measures in English and maths. The research found that there was no link between higher per pupil spending and quality of teaching as measured by Ofsted. On average the same level of funding produced 'Inadequate', 'Satisfactory', 'Good' and 'Outstanding' teaching. The report concludes that removing the ring-fence would be consistent with good education

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