Newly Qualified Social Worker Programme: final evaluation report (2008 to 2011)

Document type
Report
Author(s)
Carpenter, John; Patsios, Demi; Wood, Marsha
Publisher
Department for Education
Date of publication
1 July 2012
Series
Research report; DfE RR229
Subject(s)
Social Work, Social Care and Social Services
Collection
Social welfare
Material type
Reports

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The Newly Qualified Social Worker (NQSW) programme was originally established in 2008 as a three-year project involving the former Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC) working with employers to deliver a comprehensive programme of support to newly qualified social workers (NQSWs).

The programme was designed to ensure that NQSWs receive consistent, high quality support and that those supervising them are confident in their skills to provide support. It aimed to contribute to increasing the number of people who continue their long-term career within social work with children and families.

This report presents findings from the national evaluation of the first three years of the programme 2008-2011, covering three cohorts of NQSWs. It includes a summary of the policy and practice context of the NQSW programme; summative findings on participation in the programme, its implementation and the outcomes for NQSWs, making comparisons between the three cohorts

It also includes a set of organisational case studies to show how the programme was implemented in different organisations and a thematic analysis of the findings concerning key elements of the programme.

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