Newspaper interview with Terence Rattigan about his marital status

Description

Until 1967, homosexual acts between men were illegal, and Terence Rattigan, like most gay men, took pains to conceal his sexuality. In public he crafted the image of an eligible, heterosexual bachelor. In this interview with People magazine he ‘promptly and without any embarrassment’ gives a carefully prepared answer as to why he remained unmarried:

We [writers] make very difficult husbands. The woman I marry will have to be very understanding and capable of putting up with all my vagaries.

‘Three famous men who can’t find the right girl’

The other men featured in this interview, songwriter Ivor Novello and dress designer Norman Hartnell, were both gay too. Reporter Elizabeth Parsons muses that ‘there can be very few of my sex who meet their exacting requirements’, but, in retrospect, the reason why all three men couldn’t ‘find the right girl’ was due to their sexuality.

Full title:
The People: Newspaper interview with Terence Rattigan about his marital status
Published:
19 November 1950
Publisher:  
The People
Format:
Newspaper / Ephemera
Creator:
The People, Elizabeth Parsons
Usage terms

We have been unable to locate the copyright holder in this material. Please contact copyright@bl.uk with any information you have regarding this item.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
MFM.MLD35

Full catalogue details

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