Ophelia by John Everett Millais

Description

John Everett Millais’s vividly detailed painting Ophelia (1851–52) depicts the drowning of Ophelia from Act 4, Scene 7 of William Shakespeare's Hamlet. Elizabeth Siddal, an artist and Pre-Raphaelite artist’s model, was required to pose in a bathtub of water for hours at a time, kept warm by lamps underneath. On one occasion she caught a severe cold, sometimes attributed as pneumonia.

Full title:
Ophelia
Created:
1851-52
Format:
Artwork / Image
Creator:
John Everett Millais
Copyright:
© De Agostini Picture Library
Usage terms

© De Agnosti Picture Library

Held by
Tate
Shelfmark:
N01506

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