Thoughts and sentiments on the evil and wicked traffic

Description

This is the first British publication in which an African writer argues for an end to the slave trade and enslavement – ‘that evil, criminal and wicked traffic’. The book’s author, Ottobah Cugoano (c. 1757– after 1791), had been captured in Ghana and forced to work on plantations in Grenada. He gained his freedom after being brought to England in 1772.

Cugoano was an active abolitionist. Africans, he wrote, ‘are born as free, and are brought up with as great a predilection for their own country, freedom and liberty, as the sons and daughters of fair Britain’.

Full title:
Ottobah Cugoano, Thoughts and sentiments on the evil and wicked traffic of the slavery and commerce of the human species
Published:
London
Created:
1787
Format:
Printed book
Creator:
Ottobah Cugoano
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
T.111.(4).

Full catalogue details

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