Photograph of The Caucasian Chalk Circle, 1997

Description

The Caucasian Chalk Circle is based on an ancient Chinese story where two women claim that one child is rightfully theirs. Brecht takes this parable as the central event in a play where profound love is inextricably caught up in a precise statement about the nature of justice.

This Complicité and National Theatre production was first performed in 1997, it was directed by Simon McBurney and starred Juliet Stevenson as Grusha.

Full title:
Photograph of Juliet Stevenson in the National Theatre and Theatre de Complicité production of The Caucasian Chalk Circle, 1997
Created:
1997
Format:
Photograph / Image
Creator:
Robbie Jack
Usage terms

© Robbie Jack

Held by
Theatre de Complicité

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