Photographs of Happy Days by Samuel Beckett (2007 revival starring Fiona Shaw at the National Theatre)

Description

Samuel Beckett's 1961 play, Happy Days, was revived in 2007 at the National Theatre with Deborah Warner as director and starring Fiona Shaw in the role of Winnie. The production's striking design was devised by Tom Pye. To create the mound, in which Winnie is buried, Pye 'used a mixture of all manner of real and fake materials for the earth ... including a lot of polystyrene, grass, sand, gravel, and fake rubber crumbs, which look like earth, along with timber and technical engineering' ('Preview: Happy Days, National Theatre, London', The Independent, 2007).

Full title:
Photographs of Happy Days by Samuel Beckett (2007 revival starring Fiona Shaw at the National Theatre)
Created:
24 January 2007, National Theatre, London
Format:
Photograph / Image
Creator:
Donald Cooper [photographer]
Usage terms

© Donald Cooper / Photostage
www.photostage.co.uk

Held by
Photostage
Shelfmark:
00011261; 00011268; 00011276

Related articles

Nonsense talk: Theatre of the Absurd

Article by:
Andrew Dickson
Themes:
Theatre practitioners and genres, 20th-century theatre, Capturing and creating the modern, European influence

Absurdist theatre responded to the destruction and anxieties of the 20th century by questioning the nature of reality and illusion. Andrew Dickson introduces some of the most important figures in the Theatre of the Absurd, including Eugène Ionesco, Martin Esslin and Samuel Beckett.

An introduction to Waiting for Godot

Article by:
Chris Power
Themes:
Capturing and creating the modern, 20th-century theatre, European influence

Chris Power explores how Waiting for Godot resists straightforward interpretation, producing audiences as uncertain as its characters.

An introduction to Happy Days

Article by:
William McEvoy
Themes:
Capturing and creating the modern, European influence, 20th-century theatre

The main character in Happy Days is a middle-aged woman inexplicably buried in a mound, first to her waist and then to her neck. William McEvoy discusses how Beckett uses this character and her predicament to explore a recurring interest in his work: the failings of bodies and language.

Related collection items

Related people

Related works

Happy Days

Created by: Samuel Beckett

Happy Days (1961) overview Samuel Beckett often buries his characters literally – in urns or bins – and ...