Rochester copy of William of Malmesbury's Deeds of the Kings of the English

Description

The Deeds of the Kings of the English was written by the Anglo-Norman monk William of Malmesbury (b. c. 1095, d. c 1143), one of the leading historians of the 12th-century. This historic chronicle traces English history from Roman times until the reign of King Henry I (r. 1100–1135).

This copy may have been produced at the cathedral priory of St Andrew in Rochester, England. The name, ‘Alexander Precentor’ is written on the first page of the book in a 13th- or 14th century script next to the ownership inscription of Rochester priory. A precentor was a monk who usually fulfilled the duties of choir master and librarian, taking care of the community’s books which he kept in chests.

This manuscript was digitised with the support of The Polonsky Foundation.

Full title:
William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum Anglorum
Created:
4th quarter of the 12th century–1st quarter of the 13th century, Rochester
Format:
Manuscript
Language:
Latin
Creator:
William of Malmesbury
Usage terms

Public Domain in most countries other than the UK.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Harley MS 261

Full catalogue details

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