Spare Rib magazine issue 183

Description

Spare Rib recognised the importance of challenging sexism and stereotypes of girls and women in the education system and carried many features and news items on this subject. Articles looked at the experiences of school students and teachers and called for fundamental change both to the curriculum and to society’s attitudes towards education. Later issues focused on school girls from black and ethnic minority backgrounds.

Full title:
Spare Rib magazine issue 183
Published:
October 1987
Publisher:  
Spare Rib Collective
Format:
Magazine
Language:
English
Usage terms

Item 1: issue 183 p1 front cover, photograph of schoolgirls by Jenny Matthews
Usage terms: © Jenny Matthews Creative Commons Non-Commercial Licence

Item 2: issue 183, pp 14-18 Not Victims not Superwomen, by Ruth Chigwada
Usage terms: We have been unable to locate the copyright holder for this item. Please contact copyright@bl.uk with any information you have regarding this item.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
P.523/344

Full catalogue details

Related articles

Unfinished business in the secondary school

Article by:
Laura Carter
Theme:
Education and work

Though the 1870 Education Act established a framework for the schooling of children in Britain the provision of secondary education has remained imbalanced for children based on factors such as gender, race and class. Laura Carter explores the long view of girls in secondary education.

Black women activists in Britain

Article by:
Kelly Foster, A S Francis
Theme:
Disputes and direct action

The history of Black women’s activism in Britain is a long, rich and deeply inspiring one, yet the narratives of Black women activists have often been erased or minimised. Kelly Foster and A S Francis explore some of the individuals and organisations involved in activism, and their movements and campaigns since the late 19th century.

Girls are powerful: Young feminists’ letters to Spare Rib

Article by:
Eleanor Careless
Theme:
Spare Rib map

Intergenerational dynamics within the women’s movement have long been a source of feminist debate. This article explores how letters sent by young feminists from across the UK and Ireland helped to shape the content and style of Spare Rib, as well as showing how Spare Rib supported and guided its young readers.

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