Stamp-seal with inscription in Phoenician script

Description

The first alphabet created from Egyptian hieroglyphs in the Sinai area was picked up by Phoenician traders in the 11th century BC. They adopted the new system and altered it to suit their own needs and spread their standardised version across the Mediterranean. 

This 2,700-year-old stone seal bears the name of King Sidqa from biblical Canaan. It is written from right to left in a local variety of Phoenician characters. It contains a letter based on an ox-head, which is more abstract than its earlier form and has turned on its side, with horns pointing to the right. It is a bit closer to what we now know as a capital “A”.

Full title:
Stamp-seal with inscription in Phoenician script
Created:
8th century BC, Palestine
Format:
Seal
Language:
Phoenician
Copyright:
© Trustees of the British Museum
Usage terms
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike licence
Held by
The British Museum
Shelfmark:
1861,1201.1

Full catalogue details

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