Survey of the ruins caused by the Great Fire of London

Description

In 17th-century London fires were common, but none spread so wide or caused as much damage as the Great Fire of London, which started in a baker’s shop in Pudding Lane on 2 September 1666. This map, completed in 1677, shows the remains of the city after the Great Fire.

London was by far the largest city in England and it mainly consisted of wooden buildings, tightly packed together along very narrow streets. This poorly built urban sprawl, together with dry weather and a strong easterly wind, created the perfect conditions for the rapid spread of the fire.

It raged for four days until it was finally extinguished, largely due to a change in wind direction. By then the fire had destroyed 373 acres of the city, including more than 13,000 houses and 84 churches as well as St Paul’s Cathedral and much of London Bridge.

Full title:
AN EXACT SVRVEIGH OF THE STREETS LANES AND CHVRCHES CONTAINED WITHIN THE RVINES OF THE CITY OF LONDON : FIRST DESCRIBED IN SIX PLATS, BY IOHN LEAKE, IOHN IENNINGS, WILLIAM MARR, WILLM. LEYBVRN, THOMAS STREETE & RICHARD SHORTGAVE in Decber. Ao. 1666. BY THE ORDER OF THE LORD MAYOR ALDERMEN, AND COMMON COVNCELL OF THE SAID CITY. Reduced here into one intire plat, by Iohn Leake etc.
Published:
1667, London
Publisher:  
Nathanaell Brooke Stationer
Format:
Map / Image
Creator:
John Leake, Frederick Crace, John Gregory Crace, Wenceslaus Hollar, Jonas Moore, Ralph Greatorex
Usage terms
Public Domain
Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
Cartographic Items Maps Crace Port. 1.50

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