The Enemy Within: statements by black people on the state of race relations in Britain pamphlet

Description

In 1981 the government abolished the 1948 definition of British citizenship through the passage of the British Nationality Act. This reversed the right to citizenship by birth and created three new categories of citizenship – only one of which provided the right to live in the UK.

The Enemy Within, a photographically-illustrated pamphlet by the British Council of Churches and the Catholic Commission for Racial Justice, was published in response to the rise of deportations and racial violence in the wake of the Nationality Act. It criticizes the government’s treatment of non-White people as outsiders and calls for solidarity and compassion among all people in Britain. The pamphlet was an accompanying publication to an AV production, The Enemy Within: Statements by Black People of the State of Race Relations in Britain.

Full title:
The Enemy within : statements by black people on the state of race relations in Britain / compiled and edited by Barbara Taylor.
Published:
1981, London
Publisher:  
British Council of Churches
Format:
Pamphlet / Photograph / Image
Creator:
Barbara Taylor, British Council of Churches (England) , Michael Abrahams, Margaret Murray
Usage terms

British Council of Churches: © Courtesy of CHURCHES TOGETHER IN BRITAIN AND IRELAND

Photographs by Michael Abrahams: © Mike Abrahams

Photograph by Margaret Murray: © Maggie Murray/Format Photographers

You may not use this material for commercial purposes. Please credit the copyright holder when reusing this work.

Held by
British Library
Shelfmark:
85/38595

Full catalogue details

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